XY.com Sells for $149,557

Dec 21 2011

Today over at 4.cn, XY.com sold for 948,000 RMB or approximately $149,500 making it one of the better sales of the month. 838.c0m failed to meet reserve even though it reached $61,000.  804 also failed to reach reserve but it ended at $11,000 which left it way under market.  It also shows that the Chinese do not like numbers that end in 4, even if they are three digit numbers. There are several other CVCV and number domains about to hit some big numbers over the next few days over there as well.

I do believe this is one of the higher two letter dot com sales of all time.  Although I may be wrong. Here are other recent two letter dot com sales according to NAMEBIO.com

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  1. Jon

    Can someone with experience with 4.cn and Chinese buyers of LL.com, LLL.com, NN.com, NNN.com comment on the following.
    Do Chinese buyers mostly buy these domains for company names, or are most buyers buy them as some form of investment/collectibles?
    Is owning LL.com or NN.com something that would be considered prestigious in China?

    1. Post author


      Both for personal AND business but lending itself towards business. Yes, numbers are very collectible/presigious in China and Middle Eastern countries.

  2. Jon

    It seems that Chinese companies have no problem paying six or seven figures for a perfect short .com. Sales like 55.com and tom.com for over $2M each are good examples of that. Chinese companies seem to attach much greater importance to subjective positive image that comes with having a perfect short .com than US and western European companies. There is no way US company called 55Something.com would ever pay $2+M for 55.com, but Chinese company 55Tuan.com thought it was worth it.

    If this trend continues, pretty much all future sales of perfect short .coms will be to Chinese buyers. Then the only thing that matters when it comes to future prices is Chinese demand – how many Chinese companies are trying to buy their perfect short .com, and whatever is left of supply.

  3. Michael

    My first post at DomainShane and i believe it is also my first post in a domain blog/ website.

    I am a Chinese but my country is not China. As far as i know, the two letters combined “XY”, is very popular among the chinese side. From what i recalled, i think XY360.com was sold not long ago and i did make an offer for XYXY.com ( i think is within the past 12 months ) and got a reply.

    The price should be $4000 from what i recalled and i didnt continue the counter offer part because i happened to come across that domain in my mind and i just ask for the price thats all.

    I might be wrong but i believe the domain is bought by someone else after my offer and now listed by others because the page seems different now. One thing i am sure about is the page was changed from English to Chinese. Totally two different pages. Likely a chinese seller now.

    The two letters combined “XY” is taken in many domain names. Those “XY” plus “something”, etc XY360.com. I went into XY360.com just now and it’s a website related to Schools. It makes sense because the letters XY is somehow acronym for school in chinese.

    In my opinion, the sale price of XY.com is not high and i am not surprised if there is a quick flip on this domain name.

    I read the comments and just want to say that most chinese sites i seen are news related sites and the upcoming ones are those “coupon” sites. And i think short domains consist of numbers and letters are popular among the chinese as of now. If you observe they are willing to go for .net too. Etc those four letters “NLNL” type domains and so on. They are also willing to hand-registered it as far as i know. From what i see from auctions, those chinese words in the form of Hanyu Pinyin are going strong in prices too. Recently, the word “Yun” that means Cloud is popular in auctions and a lot of them registered sometime back as well. Of course we do know because of the recent “Cloud” trend.

    That’s all. Just sharing some info and opinion.

    For those who like to know more or more in-depth discussion with me, feel free to contact me. Michael@FirstWeek.com


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